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CONSERVATION

ASCOMOTI - Association for the Conservation of the Mono Tití

The mono tití, or the grey crowned red-backed squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii citrinellus) is the smallest primates in Costa Rica. This subspecies are only found in and around Quepos/Manuel Antonio National Park on the Central Pacific Coast of Costa Rica. They have been listed as Critically Endangered by IUCN Red List since 1996. ASCOMOTI is doing what they can to preserve and protect this delightful primate. Please join them in this fight.

Species Information and Reasons for being listed as Critically Endangered

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Class: Mammalia; Order: Primates; Family: Cebidae; Species: Saimiri oerstedii ssp. citrinellus.
Common Names:
(English) BLACK-CROWNED CENTRAL AMERICAN SQUIRREL MONKEY, CENTRAL AMERICAN SQUIRREL MONKEY, RED-BACKED SQUIRREL MONKEY
(Français) SAÏMIRI À DOS ROUX, SINGE-ÉCUREUIL À DOS ROUGE, SINGE-ÉCUREUIL À DOS ROUX. (Español) BARIZO DORSIRROJO, MONO ARDILLA, MONO TITÍ

During the 1950s, logging and cattle ranching were encouraged in the region, and large areas were planted with African oil palms and rice. At present the area is mainly used for pastures, crops, wood, African oil palm and fruit plantations (Sierra et al. 2003). There are scattered forest fragments, coastal mangroves and large remnants of forest in the Manuel Antonio National Park and a northern fringe of uninterrupted forest that extends above 1,000 m. The Mono Tití has a very restricted range on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, centered on Quepos. Occurs in one protected area: the Manuel Antonio National Park (683 ha). There is some dispute by different teams as to total numbers. The larger estimate is 1,300 - 1,800 individuals (Wong 1990, Sierra et al. 2003; but see Boinski et al. 1998). The Critically Endangered assessment is based on the species' extent of occurrence (201 km²), historic loss of habitat (89%) and severe fragmentation. - Source IUCN Red List.


10 Reasons Not to Feed the Monkeys

1. Monkeys are highly susceptible to diseases from human hands. They can die from bacteria transferred off your hand that has no ill effect on you.

2. Migration to human-populated areas to be fed increases the risk of dog attacks and road accidents.

3. Irregular feeding leads to an aggressive behaviour towards humans and other species.

4. Contrary to the stereotype, bananas are not the preferred food of monkeys in the wild. Bananas, especially those containing pesticides, can be upsetting to the monkeys' delicate digestive system and cause serious dental problems that can lead to eventual death.

mono titi, mono ardilla, grey crowned central american squirrel monkey

Critically Endangered Mono Tití; Mono Ardilla;
Grey Crowned Central American Squirrel Monkey

5. Feeding creates a dangerous dependency on humans that diminishes the monekys' survival abilities.

6. Feeding interferes with the monkeys' natural habits and upsets the balance of their lifestyle centered on eating wild fruits, seeds, small animals, and insects.

7. Contact with humans facilitates poaching and the trade in illegal wildlife.

8. Pregnant females who are fed nothing but bananas during their pregnancy will not give birth to healthy infants. Tha babies will be malnourished, or never develop to term, and die before birth.

9. Monkeys need to travel an average of 17 kilometers each day to be in good physical condition. If they know that food is available in a particular location, they will not leave that area.

10. Not only do we pass on diseases to animals when we feed them by hand, but they pass diseases to us as well.

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